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    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    The 1934 Chevrolet Master (Series DA) replaced the 1933 Eagle series. The wheelbase was increased to 112 inches, 5 inches longer than the lower priced Chevrolet Standard Six (Series DC).

    It was powered by an upgraded version of the “Stovebolt Six”, a 206 cubic inch six-cylinder engine that produced 80 hp.

    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    The 1934 Chevrolet Master was mostly unchanged from the previous model year. The most visible changes were a new V-type radiator and grille. Also, the three louvers on the side of the cowl were shortened.

    It also featured ‘Knee-Action’ front suspension and coil springs.

    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    The rear had a semi-floating axle. Mechanical brakes on all four wheels and a three-speed manual transmission were standard.

    1934 Chevrolet Master 4 Door Sedan

    Built from 1933–1942, the Master name was used on a number of different versions. The series name changed each model year.

    Check this page to find more striking classic cars of the 1930s.

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    Electric and Steam Cars – Alternative Power Classics

    1931 Detroit Electric Model 97 Brougham

    Electric and Steam Cars – Alternative Power Classics

    While electric and steam cars date back to the 1800’s, by the early 1900s there was a lot of competition between steam, electric and gasoline powered cars.

    Eventually, as the internal combustion engine rapidly developed, both electric and steam cars fell out of favor with the buying public, who favored cars with less expensive and more powerful internal combustion engines.

    Here are a few alternative power classics that we’ve recently run across that you might also enjoy seeing.

    1903 Stanley Steamer Stick Seat Runabout

    1903 Stanley Steamer Stick Seat Runabout

    1905 Stanley CX Runabout

    1905 Stanley CX Runabout

    1929 Detroit Electric Model 98FD

    1929 Detroit Electric Model 98FD

    1917 Milburn Light Electric Model 27

    1917 Milburn Model 27

    1908 White Model L Steam Car

    1908 White Model L Steam Car

    1931 Detroit Electric Model 97

    1931 Detroit Electric Model 97

    1911 Waverley Victoria Phaeton Convertible

    1911 Waverley Victoria Phaeton Convertible

    1931 Detroit Electric Model 97 Brougham

    1931 Detroit Electric Model 97 Brougham

    1900 Mobile Runabout

    1900 Mobile Runabout

    1926 Auto Red Bug

    1926 Auto Red Bug

    Want to Find Out More About Alternative Power Classics? Check These Out

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    Classic Cars of the Roaring ’20s

    1928 Hupmobile Model E-4 Series Sedan

    Classic Cars of the Roaring ’20s

    The classic cars of the roaring ’20s featured many of the innovations that we think are new today, like electric powered cars, four wheel drive, front wheel drive, and even hybrid fuel/electric cars. These automotive innovations were in fact all introduced in the 1920’s.

    You may not be familiar with all of the cars, but you will remember the flowing curves, rakish lines, bright paint colors and dual tone color schemes that were features of many of the classic cars of the Great Gatsby era. Here are a few memorable cars we’ve recently seen.

    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    Get more details about this 1928 Model 75 Sport Roadster here.

    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    You can get more details about this 1928 Model 85 Sport Roadster here.

    1923 Kissel 6-55 Brougham Opera Sedan

    1923 Kissel Model 6-55 Brougham Opera Sedan

    1923 Kissel Model 6-55 Brougham Opera Sedan

    Another of the great classic cars of the roaring ’20s, this 1923 Kissel Opera Sedan is one of two still in existence. You can follow the restoration of the other 1923 Kissel Model 6-55 Brougham Opera Sedan on this page.

    1929 Erskine by Studebaker 52W Sedan

    1929 Erskine by Studebaker 52W Sedan

    This car was named after the president of Studebaker at that time. The Erskine only lasted for a four year production run and they only made 25,565 with only a little over 200 registered cars surviving like this one.

    1928 Hupmobile Model E-4 Series Sedan

    1928 Hupmobile Model E-4 Series Sedan

    Series E Hupmobiles came equipped with an eight-cylinder in-line L-head, 60-Horsepower engine. The Series E was offered in touring, sedan, like the one shown, coupes (with or without rumble seats) and roadsters.

    The Series E would remain in production through 1928, when was replaced with the Model M.

    1922 Haynes Model 75 Tourster

    1922 Haynes Model 75 Tourister

    Haynes was one of the most innovative automakers of the 1922 Haynes 75 Tourister has a unique system called a volatilizer which atomizes fuel more efficiently, thus creating more power in the model 75 engine, which was introduced in 1922.

    1924 Studebaker Light six EM Coupe

    1924 Studebaker EM Coupe

    1921 Kissel Gold Bug

    1921 Kissel Gold Bug

    1921 Kissel Gold Bug

    1921 Kissel Gold Bug

    1929 Buick Model 55 Sport Phaeton

    1929 Buick Model 55 Sport Phaeton

    1928 Chrysler Model 52

    1928 Chrysler Model 52

    Love Classic Cars of the ’20s? You’re Gonna Love These

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    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    The Gardner Model 75 was the “base” roadster that Gardner built. Powered by a 226 ci inline 8 cylinder engine, it was the lowest priced eight on the market in 1928, priced at $1,195.

    Additional features included 4 wheel mechanical brakes, 6″ balloon tires with wooden wheels, and bar type bumpers.

    1928 Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster

    Interior features included dash-mounted gas and temperature gauges, silver-finished hardware, walnut wood trim and window ledges, a full walnut steering wheel and mohair upholstery.

    The Gardner Model 75 Sport Roadster was one of three roadsters built in 1928 by the Gardner Motor Car Company in St.Louis, Missouri in 1928, the others being the Model 85 and 95.

    Visit this page if you would like to see more great cars of the “Roaring ’20s”.

    Love Classic Cars of the ’20s? You’re Gonna Love These

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    1913 American Underslung Scout Roadster

    1913 American Underslung

    1913 American Underslung Scout Roadster

    Built by the American Motor Company, the American Underslung was considered to be America’s first sports car.

    The company, located in Indianapolis, Indiana, was noted for its creative designs, effective marketing, and brilliant automobiles, like this 1913 American Underslung Scout Roadster.

    1913 American Underslung

    In 1906, inspired by frames that were unloaded upside down when delivered to American, chief engineer Fred Tone conceived the idea to mount the frame under the axles, and the “underslung” design was born.

    Moving forward, American built all roadsters underslung, while continuing to make touring cars and sedans on a conventional overslung chassis.

    1913 American Underslung Scout Roadster was powered by a 32 hp, 161 cu. in. four-cylinder T-head engine, and a sliding gear three-speed manual transmission with reverse.

    Features also included a Warner 60mph speedometer, dog leg windshield and a disco self-starter. American also included battery operated electric tail and dash lights for further ease of use while the unique nickel headlamps were powered by a Prest-O-Lite acetylene tank.

    1913 American Underslung

    In 1912, the American Motor Company officially adopted “American Underslung” as the car’s name. They produced more than 45,000 vehicles from 1906 through April, 1914, when operations were suspended.

    If you’re interested in seeing more great classic cars of the early 1900’s, be sure to check out Horseless Carriages from the Brass Era.

    Love Brass Era Cars? You Might Like These

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    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster


    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    The Gardner Motor Car Company was based in St. Louis, Missouri and manufactured cars from 1920 to 1931, including this 1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster.

    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    The 1928 Gardner roadster model featured an inline 247 cubic inch Lycoming engine that produced 86 HP, and a high-speed rear end, a common practice of the time made possible by the light body weight.

    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    Standard equipment for the Gardner Sport Roadster included wood wheels, but wire wheels and dual side mounts were available on the 85 model.

    Other notable features included hydraulic brakes, a unique automatic lubrication system where oil is supplied to the front and rear shackles based on the up and down motion of the front end, tubular bumpers, and its Griffin radiator mascot.

    1928 Gardner Model 85 Sport Roadster

    Gardner’s attention to detail is evident in the art-deco design on the door sills and dashboard, as well as offering a choice of more than 50 color combinations and 25 trim choices. Pretty unusual for a company that produced less than 4,000 cars in 1928.

    You can follow the painstaking process of resurrecting this 1928 Model 85 Sport Roadster in this Hemmings magazine article.

    If you’re interested in more great classic cars of the 1920’s, be sure to visit this page.

    Love Classic Cars of the ’20s? You’re Gonna Love These

  • 1966 Pontiac GTO

    Other than the color, this beautiful 1966 Pontiac GTO is in the process of being restored to the specs on the original build sheet. Owner Gail Haskins has dreamed of owning one of these since she was a teenager.

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